Where Does Marketing Architecture Fit In The Vendor Landscape?

  “Before I hire an agency, I need a company like yours to rebuild our marketing architecture.” That’s been said to us quite a bit in the first part of 2013, which makes it an interesting topic for discussion. The specific discussion: How is the landscape of marketing vendors shifting and where does marketing architecture […]

Marketing.Fit

 

“Before I hire an agency, I need a company like yours to rebuild our marketing architecture.” That’s been said to us quite a bit in the first part of 2013, which makes it an interesting topic for discussion. The specific discussion: How is the landscape of marketing vendors shifting and where does marketing architecture now fit in that chain?

Every day, more and more companies heed the prevailing notion that to successfully manage their own brands and marketing conversations with customers, they must build internal staff to do so. And to a great extent, they are right. Gone are the days when advertising agencies owned the media planning and media buying initiative. And as companies work hard to understand and react to the specific needs of customers and consumers, it makes sense that they build internal resources to manage these day-to-day conversations. Technology and specifically, social media, have driven this change.

But what of advertising agencies, PR firms and other marketing and digital agencies? While they continue to represent the greatest share of marketing vendors, they are increasingly becoming experts in execution. Which means that strategy, and the direction and frameworks built from strategy, are no longer their focus (and really, never have been).

As marketing issues, audiences, and challenges become more complex, however, marketing, brand and communications architecture becomes more critical. To build a concise and well-crafted foundation that houses positioning and messaging for brand, product, service (and a host of other areas) creates needed efficiencies and a welcome blueprint for the myriad internal and external resources expected to speak with a common and cohesive voice.

And if our recent conversations are any indication, CMOs and other marketing executives are beginning to truly see the need for an expert, outside resource focused exclusively on strategy and architecture — the ‘front-end’ of the marketing process. A value-added vendor that works ‘in addition’ to agencies and internal resources to save companies money, time and frustration.

By the way, how is your Marketing Architecture?


Brian Creath is the president of Cohesion, a St. Louis-based marketing direction company that works with Fortune 500 and mid-sized organizations to build and enhance strategic purpose through innovative research, positioning, messaging and creative direction. Since 1999, Cohesion has used its approach to help companies deliver more relevance and revenue from their marketing efforts.


 

 

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